Museum
Events

All MCAM exhibitions and programs are open to the public. Admission is free unless otherwise stated.

Paik SEP 16, 2017 OPENING RECEPTION: IN-BETWEEN PLACES: KOREAN-AMERICAN ARTISTS IN THE BAY AREA 6:00-8:00 pm, ART MUSEUM
Featuring new work by Jung Ran Bae, Sohyung Choi, Kay Kang, Miran Lee, Youngjune Lew, Nicholas Oh, Younhee Paik, and Minji Soh, In-Between Places reveals the reality and complexities of being a Korean artist in America. Since the beginning of the Korean diaspora, Korean-Americans have continued to occupy the in-between spaces of ambiguous identity.
Lee SEP 23, 2017 NEW TRADITIONS: KOREAN CULTURAL WEEK LAUNCH 2:00-6:00 pm, ART MUSEUM
MCAM and the Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in San Francisco present a day of family friendly Korean arts workshops lead by exhibiting artists Miran Lee and Kay Kang. Workshops will be followed by a performance with internationally renowned haegeum musician Soo-yeon Lyuh in collaboration with contemporary Bay Area musicians performing new compositions.
Dwelling OCT 21, 2017 DWELLING IN-BETWEEN: KOREAN AMERICANS IN THE BAY AREA 2:00-5:00 pm, DAVID BROWER CENTER IN BERKELEY
Korean American visual artists, writers, and scholars share their praxis and reflections on the Korean diaspora about the transnational connections of Korean American cultural production. Featuring presentations by In-Between Places curator Linda Inson Choy, Jung Ran Bae (artist), Laura Kang (UC Irvine), Myung Mi Kim (poet), Rosemarie Nahm (Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation); and Minji Sohn (artist).
Liem OCT 25, 2017 FIRST PERSON PLURAL, MOVIE & DIRECTOR'S TALK WITH DEANN BORSHAY LIEM 6:30-8:30 pm, DANFORTH LECTURE HALL
In 1966, Deann Borshay Liem was adopted by an American family and was sent from Korea to her new home. Growing up in California, the memory of her birth family was nearly obliterated until recurring dreams lead Deann to discover the truth: her Korean mother was very much alive. Bravely uniting her biological and adoptive families, Deann's heartfelt journey makes First Person Plural a poignant essay on family, loss, and the reconciling of two identities.